Thursday, June 22, 2017

BENECIA CA - CONSTANCE BEUTEL AND HER 2 SCOTTISH TERRIERS WERE ATTACKED IN FEBRUARY BY 5 PIT BULLS THAT ESCAPED A CAR THEY WERE LIVING IN WITH THEIR TRANSIENT OWNER

Scotties Rory and Jesse survived an attack from five pit bulls in February, and their owner wants to see the city’s codes for dangerous animals strengthened as a result.

It was one of the most terrifying moments of her life.  While walking her two Scottish terriers in central Benicia in late February, Constance Beutel and her dogs were attacked by FIVE PIT BULLS THAT ESCAPED FROM A NEARBY CAR.  

“It was a horrifying blur,” she said.
Though Beutel is a veteran of the Vietnam War, she ranks the experience as one of the scariest events she’s encountered.
The good news is that both she and her dogs are OK.  A neighbor heard her struggle and came to her rescue. Her dogs recovered from their injuries, and Beutel said she emerged with only psychological scars.
She quickly reported the incident to the police, who had prior knowledge of the pit bulls living in a car. According to them, the city’s animal control officer had been working with the transient owner of the car to find stable homes for his dogs. Since he was not officially a Benicia resident — he often visits his grandfather, who is — he wasn’t required to adhere to the “three dogs maximum” rule in town and could not be cited.
Beutel got yet another shock when she reported the incident. She expected that the dangerous dogs would be impounded until an investigation took place. Instead, the dog’s owner was only issued citations for having unlicensed, off-leash animals, she said.
It was then that Beutel decided to advocate for changing the animal control regulations found in the municipal code. Beutel appeared at Tuesday’s Benicia City Council meeting to share her story and recommend that the issue be placed on a future agenda.
With her at the meeting were a couple who lost their cat after a dog jumped a five-foot fence into their yard. Though the neighbor’s dog killed their beloved pet, the owner was ordered to keep their dog in a secure area, and when the dog is in public, it must be on a leash and under the control of someone over 18.
Two other people took the microphone during the public comment period and shared stories of loose dogs and dog attacks and the need for better regulation of the issue.
Basically, Beutel and others would like there to be harsher penalties for dogs that bite or kill other animals.
At the very least, said Beutel, if someone has a dog that has been deemed vicious by its actions, a sign should be posted on their property notifying the community of the danger. But Beutel is requesting that the council consider the option of euthanizing dogs that attack or kill  a domestic animal in town, after first impounding the animal and holding a hearing.
She’d also like to see the code updated to cover dogs that “chase or attack domestic animals.”
Were this in the provision, she argued, the owner of the pit bulls that attacked her could have been cited for more than just not having them on a leash and unlicensed.
So far she’s met with responsive ears from the police department and city attorney, both of which recommended she bring the issue to the council.
Mayor Elizabeth Patterson pointed out on Tuesday that the council had left room for discussion on this issue on the table when it revamped the code to include mini pigs.
The council is expected to agendize the examination of the current codes regarding dangerous animals and possibly adopt some or all of Beutel’s suggestions.
“We respectfully ask you to … put this on your agenda before another individual or pet is maimed or killed,” Beutel said.

DEDHAM MA - AN "EMOTIONAL SUPPORT PIT BULL" CHARGED INTO AN APARTMENT AND FLEXED ITS DNA BY KILLING DEAD AS A DOOR KNOB JANE REGAN'S BELOVED SWEET CAT "GEM"

apartment Emotional Support Dog Kills Neighbors Cat In Dedham Apartment


DEDHAM (CBS) – A cat was killed in a vicious attack at a Dedham apartment complex. A PIT BULL  ran into a Jane Regan’s apartment and killed her cat Gem.
“That was one of the things that made me most sad about what happened to Gem, was that Gem died so scared,” said Regan.
After recently getting a new cell phone, Regan misses her lost photos of her sweet cat Gem. Because the one image she can’t erase from her mind is the way her pet was killed.
“By the time I came in the house the dog had her cornered,” Regan said. “She was dead and it was pretty gruesome.”
gem Emotional Support Dog Kills Neighbors Cat In Dedham Apartment
There is a strict no pit bull policy at the Avalon Station 250 complex, but the dog was still allowed to live there as an emotional support animal.
Jane had been enjoying some sunshine with her daughter and months-old grandbaby. Suddenly the pit bull without a collar charged across their patio and into their apartment.
"Eventually the dog just kind of looked up and walked out, like the game was over," Regan recalled.  "There's blood on his paws and his face and stuff and he's just hanging around." 
Dedham Police responded, along with Animal Control days later. Because of the dog’s violent behavior, property managers told the owner it could not stay in their home.

CANYON LAKE TX - A 5-YEAR-OLD HORSE "MAXI" IS RECOVERING AFTER BEING MAULED BY AN OFF-LEASH PIT BULL MIX



Maxi, a five-year-old horse who resides at the Canyon Lake Equestrian Center, is recovering after being mauled by a dog during an early morning trail ride.

Maxi was playing in the water at the jump lagoon when her owner, Dori Lowe, first noticed a woman with a dog off leash. Dori describes the dog as a PIT BULL MIX. Thirty minutes later, Dori was on the trail behind the baseball fields when she spotted the woman and dog again.
Dori said she was riding Maxi when the dog ran up to them and started biting on her boots. “The dog’s owner said her daughter use to have a horse and the dog loves to play with boots and stirrups,” said Dori.
Dori turned Maxi around with the hopes of getting the dog to go away. Instead of stopping, the dog grabbed Maxi’s tail and started pulling her. “Once the dog tore the tail wrap, the dog bit both of Maxi’s legs and her stomach,” said Dori. “I couldn’t get the dog to stop and the woman just stood there and watched.”
After the dog bit Maxi, it went for Dori. The dog tore her pants, grabbed her by her jacket and pulled her off the horse. Once Dori fell off the horse, the horse took off running towards the barn. “I turned around to look back at the women and she was just walking away back towards the jump lagoon,” said Dori.
Dr. McNeel happened to be at the barn when Maxi returned without her rider. He attended to her wounds immediately. “Fortunately when a horse runs to the barn without a rider, good friends are there to help,” said Dori.
Maxi suffered severe bite wounds to her stomach and both legs. Dori had scratch marks on her leg where the dog tore her pants.
After reporting the incident to the Riverside Police Department, Animal Control and Canyon Lake Community Patrol, Dori took to social media in hopes of finding the dog’s owner. Her efforts paid off. 
Dori discovered that the dog’s owner is a Canyon Lake resident who resides on Longhorn Dr. She reported the information to the authorities who located the owner. According to Animal Friends of the Valleys Animal Control Officer Monique Middleton, the dog’s owner received a $100 Administrative Citation for violation of Running at Large and was put on a 36-month probation Public Safety Order. As a condition of probation, the dog must be on a leash no longer than six-feet and wear a muzzle when in public for the next three years. “These measures are taken to protect the public,” said the officer.
Officer Middleton confirmed that the dog was vaccinated and up-to-date on its shots, but was not licensed. The owner was cited for a license violation.
Dori said the dog’s owner has not reached out to her and, to her knowledge, has not been to the barn to check on Maxi.
Although Maxi’s wounds are beginning to heal, the horse is still traumatized and depressed, and reluctant to come out of her stall.
“She’s been taken off her pain medicine since her ulcers are also a concern. She’s on antibiotics for her open wounds,” said Dori. “We’re just trying to make her as comfortable as possible.”
Since the incident, Maxi has received many visitors at the barn. Dori said she is grateful for the support of the community and her friends at the barn.
“Maxi loves the attention and the carrots she’s been getting from the kids. It is so sweet to know that Maxi is loved by such kind people in the community.”

SANDY SPRINGS GA - A LOOSE PIT BULL ATTACKED A WOMAN AND HER SMALL DOG WHILE THEY WERE TAKING A WALK AT THEIR APARTMENT COMPLEX...POLICE BELIEVE THE PIT BELONGS TO A RESIDENT LIVING IN THE COMPLEX


Sandy Springs police are searching for a pit bull and its owner after a woman said she was attacked by the dog.
Channel 2 Action News acquired the audio from a 911 call on June 9 where a manager of an apartment complex off Spalding Trail Northeast called after a woman was bit in the hand by a PIT BULL. Police told Channel 2 that the victim was walking her dog when a loose pit bull approached them.
Police said the pit bull started attacking her dog and then bit the woman. The pit bull was gone by the time officers arrived. The victim’s dog suffered several bites to the body, police said. Both were treated on scene.
“Dogs are required to be on a leash or be confined. They can’t be out roaming free,” Sgt. Sam Worsham of Sandy Springs police told Channel 2. “Owners can face charges and penalties for having their dogs loose.”
Others living in the apartment complex told Channel 2 they have seen loose dogs running in the area. Police believe the pit bull belongs to a resident living in the complex.

http://www.ajc.com/news/local/cops-fulton-woman-attacked-pit-bull-while-walking-apartment/fELa1FJXf2YpnujzgYfoCK/


CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA - 2 DOGS, A PIT BULL AND A ROTTWEILER, JUMPED A 2-M HIGH FENCE AND INVADED A YARD WHERE A GRANDFATHER WAS KEEPING HIS TWIN GRANDDAUGHTERS...AUBREY MURPHY AND ONE OF THE TWINS WERE SEVERELY MAULED



Cape Town – A grandfather and his three-year-old granddaughter have been mauled by a neighbour’s two dogs, A PIT BULL AND A ROTTWEILER, who jumped a 2m-high fence to get into their yard.

Aubrey Murphy, 56, and little Emma Murphy, 3, were saved by neighbours who heard their blood-curdling cries for help. The two both underwent surgery on Tuesday night, and are currently in the intensive care unit.

The police and Cape of Good Hope SPCA were called to Garlandale Crescent in Athlone just before 5pm on Tuesday.

The SPCA’s Belinda Abraham has confirmed four dogs were removed from a neighbour’s yard:  “We can confirm that four dogs were removed from an Athlone residence on Tuesday night following an alleged attack on a child and an adult male.”

Emma had to undergo a six-hour operation at Red Cross Children's Hospital, after suffering injuries to her head, face and eyes.  Both her eyes are intact but half of her skull had been ripped off, her family said on Wednesday.  The little girl is expected to undergo reconstructive and plastic surgery. 


Aubrey's arm was nearly ripped off and he also has severe bite marks on his body. He is being treated at Vincent Pallotti Hospital in Pinelands. 

Emma’s maternal grandfather, Cliff Augustyn, 58, says Aubrey had been home looking after his twin granddaughters.

Aubrey was inside the house with Emma and her twin sister Kate when he heard a commotion outside. It is believed little Emma followed him when he went to investigate.
It is believed Kate stood at the doorway and the dogs did not attack her.

Cliff says the dogs first went for Emma and when Aubrey tried to get them off her, they turned on him.

Neighbours who heard Emma’s cries for help called the police and tried to stop the dogs.

“The neighbours were alerted by Emma’s screams and one neighbour broke part of the fence to get here,” says Cliff.

“When my daughter Tracey [Murphy] called me, she thought Aubrey would not make it, the skin and flesh was hanging off his arm.”

“Emma had to be sedated for the pain and Aubrey is in a stable condition."

“Part of Emma’s scalp was ripped off.” The family has requested that no images of Emma be published.

Meanwhile, Belinda says the confiscated dogs will be cared for at the SPCA until a decision has been made about their fate.

“The City’s by-laws state that a dog which has been seized or impounded and which is found by the authorised official to be ferocious, vicious or dangerous, may be destroyed.”

The Daily Voice visited the home of the dog owners, but no one answered the door.




YONKERS NY - 2 BULLMASTIFFS MAULED AN 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL WHILE WALKING TO HER SCHOOL BUS STOP...SHE WAS BITTEN FROM HEAD TO TOE!!!


An 11-year-old girl was mauled by two dogs while walking to her school bus stop in Yonkers Thursday morning.

Authorities say Jaelyn Rodriguez was attacked by TWO BULL MASTIFFS near her home on Yonkers Avenue just after 7 a.m.

The dogs reportedly were not leashed and knocked Rodriguez to the ground.

"She is bit everywhere from the neck to the feet," Rodriguez's mother said. "They were loose. No one was with them, and they attacked her. They totally just attacked her."

She suffered bites, puncture wounds and scratches on her legs, arms and torso.

"They were trying to pull that (pointing at bench) off to throw at that dog," said witness Marilyn Garcia, who was driving by when she saw the attack happening. "They started throwing bottles, throwing everything they can, and those dogs would not let her go. She was screaming for dear live, 'Help me, help me,' And I'm just standing here, like, I don't know what to do."

A good Samaritan was able to grab Rodriguez and drive her directly to St. Joseph's Hospital, where she was treated and released.

Still, her mom says not only is she physically injured, but also traumatized emotionally.

"She was afraid they were going to come back and attack her, afraid that another dog will come," she said. "So she's just scared."

Yonkers police arrived shortly after Rodriguez was taken to the hospital, and officers attempted to control the dogs, which they say were displaying aggressive behavior. But ultimately, authorities say they were forced to shoot the animals.

Detectives are currently talking to the owner, but so far, no charges have been filed.

http://abc7ny.com/news/11-year-old-yonkers-girl-attacked-by-2-dogs-near-bus-stop/2132552/


KURANDA, QUEENSLAND AU - A BULLMASTIFF BELIEVED TO BE A FORMER PIG-HUNTING DOG ATTACKED A 3-YEAR-OLD BOY ON THE FACE



The father of a toddler who was hospitalised when his head was split open and cheeks punctured from a dog bite has called for the animal to be killed.

Forest Gardens plumber George Vizzard’s three-year-old son, Fredrick, was discharged from Cairns Hospital with about 20 stitches to his face on Wednesday. He was bitten by a BULL MASTIFF at a private property in Kuranda two days earlier. The alleged attacker was believed to be a former pig-hunting dog  and had not been seen by Mareeba Shire Council yesterday.  Mr Vizzard says he wants the dog found and put down.

“I was at work and got a message that he had been bitten. I thought it was his arm or something but then I got to hospital and saw his face had all been stuffed,” the 26-year-old said.

Mr Vizzard was shocked when they took his son’s bandage off.

“The bite starts up his hairline and comes down to his ear,” he said. “He had puncture wounds in his cheeks.” 

Fredrick was taken to Cairns Hospital on Monday afternoon in an ambulance. A Mareeba Shire Council spokesman confirmed a report was received yesterday morning and officers were investigating the allegations.  “Council is working with QPS and the owner of the dog to locate the animal,” he said.  “Council has contacted the owner of the dog and those involved in the incident.”

The spokesman said appropriate action would be taken once the investigation was complete. Mr Vizzard said it was a “big dog”.  “I don’t think he mauled him or anything,” he said. The attack is one of 99 reported dog attacks in the shire this financial year.

Mr Vizzard has urged parents to be careful when their kids are playing around dogs.  “Especially if they are hunting dogs,” he said.“  It doesn’t matter if the owners tell you it’s placid. This dog was usually pretty placid – that is probably why they didn’t expect it. “The dog must have been in a bad mood or something that day.”

http://www.goldcoastbulletin.com.au/news/national/cairns-toddler-recovering-after-brutal-dog-attack-dad-wants-dog-dead/news-story/38ec7aaf7d4ed9a439643c4538e043fd


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

ATHENS AL - NATIVE ALABAMIAN AND RETIRED LIEUTENANT COLONEL FROM THE ARMY SIGNAL CORPS NOW LIVES IN MADISON WITH HER BELOVED SERVICE DOG "GABBY"...GABBY'S LEG WAS MANGLED WHEN SHE WAS ATTACKED BY A PIT BULL OUTSIDE AN ATHENS RESTAURANT

Marilyn McCallister and her service dog, Gabby, are both 'wounded warriors.' McCallister suffers from Gulf War Syndrome and other ailments associated with her military service, and Gabby has PTSD after being attacked by a pit bull.
Marilyn McAllister knew what she wanted to do when she graduated from Sheffield High School in 1976. She wanted to go to Notre Dame, so she made sure she got an ROTC scholarship. She wanted a military career, and she got that, too. 
After serving her country, she came home to Alabama. Now her life centers around doctor's appointments for herself and caring for her beloved service dog, Gabby. Neighbors in her apartment complex in Madison would never guess that this diminutive woman, walking with her Toy Pomeranian, is a retired lieutenant colonel with 22 years in the Army Signal Corps, where she was one of the first women paratroopers, with over 150 jumps to her credit. 
While stationed at Fort Bragg, she was moved up to jump master, and fell through the night sky with 80 pounds of equipment on her back. She can demonstrate how to land with her knees and feet together to lessen the pressure. Still, she says she's two inches shorter than she used to be. 
Her size didn't stop her from serving with distinction in Bosnia, Haiti, Somalia, Saudi, Iraq, and then stateside during Hurricane Andrew. In more than two decades in the service, she's seen war close up. She's felt the ground shake when scud missiles destroyed buildings; she's seen lifeless bodies on war-torn streets, she's been exposed to chemical sites and sarin gas and insecticides. It was part of the job, she says. 
She'd planned on an Army career, but she hadn't planned on getting Gulf War Syndrome, a cluster of medical problems including breathing difficulties, IBS, chronic fatigue, and, in McAllister's case, a severe choking problem while eating. After retirement, she carried a knife with her in case she had to perform an emergency tracheotomy on herself.
Fortunately, she never had to. Instead, she got a rescue dog from Colorado, trained by the ski patrol to dig under the snow after an avalanche and clear the throat of a skier buried under deep snow. "Choking alert" dogs use their tongue to clear a passage, something people may find distasteful, but it saves lives. 
Gabby's only had to perform this procedure once when McAllister choked during a meal, but she's trained to follow the command whenever she's needed. She's also a fine companion, staying at her mistresses' side when PTSD nightmares come or vision problems occur.

So it was natural that McAllister took good care of Gabby when she was attacked by a PIT BULL outside of an Athens restaurant a few months ago. Before her surgery, her right leg dangled uselessly and is still not fully healed.

Because of her trauma, she developed a dog's version of PTSD, so McAllister took her to Island Dog Training Center so she could get used to being around other dogs again.
Now they are two wounded warriors, helping each other get through the day. 
"I'd do anything for her," McAllister says. "We're always together." 
They are together on trips to Honduras, where the healing waters of the Caribbean wash over McAllister's skin wounds as she swims. Gabby follows closely behind in a small kayak. They are together when McAllister eats lunch with other vets or runs errands. 
Mcallister wants to make the most of the time they have together. She knows that Gulf War vets have limited life spans; it comes with the territory. She also worries about cutbacks in benefits for those whose war wounds don't heal, and hopes the administration will keep its promise to take car of disabled vets. 
She urges them to call the VA to ask about getting a service dog. "If you need one, get one," she says. "It can change your life."