Thursday, October 19, 2017

DETROIT MI - TYRELL THOMAS, 5, WAS RIDING HIS BIKE WHEN HE WAS ATTACKED BY A LOOSE PIT BULL AND HIS PARENTS WANT TO KNOW WHY THE CITY ISN'T DOING MORE TO GET DANGEROUS DOGS OUT OF THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD


 - After a little boy was attacked by a dog in Detroit, his parents are telling FOX 2 their son isn't the first victim and they want to know why the city isn't doing more to get these dangerous dogs out of their neighborhood.
Tyrell Thomas was riding his bike when the 5-year-old was attacked by a stray dog this past Friday in front of his east side Detroit home. His father, Tyrone Thomas, says the neighborhood is full of them.
Tyrell has had one surgery already - about 45 stitches- and has two more surgeries to go, including plastic surgery, to hopefully remove the scar.

"Just yesterday we came out to check the mail and there was one standing out here - real big one, growling at us, acting like it wanted to attack us," said Tyrell's brother, Tyrone Thomas, Jr.

Even the mail carrier told FOX 2 off camera that she carries Mace at all times because she's been attacked by PIT BULLS  on her route between Morang and Moross and Kelly and Chandler Park.
"I'm afraid for the kids and elderly (people) walking around here trying to go to the store and take care of their business, and these vicious stray pit bulls are around attacking people," his father said.
After the attack the people took off down the road, so the likelihood of finding out who owns the dog is low. Calls have been made to animal control, and they have been out.
"Yesterday they showed up. As a matter of fact they got one of them yesterday," Tyrone said.
But resident say there's a lot more stray dogs to round up.

STAFFORD COUNTY VA - LARRY MARSHALL, 80, BELIEVES A JUDGE MADE A GRAVE ERROR BY DECLARING A GREAT DANE THAT HAD ATTACKED HIM 3 TIMES A "DANGEROUS" DOG INSTEAD OF A "VICIOUS" DOG

Larry Marshall
Larry Marshall says he has always loved dogs and has owned them most of his life.
But a 2-year-old GREAT DANE that lives next door to him in Marsh Run Estates in the Hartwood area of Stafford County is not among the canines that give Marshall a warm and fuzzy feeling.
Marshall is angry that the dog has been allowed to live after biting him three times in less than a month after coming onto Marshall’s property. The third bite ripped off part of Marshall’s right ear, a wound that will require extensive surgeries.
“The pain was excruciating and there was absolutely no reason for it,” the 80-year-old Marshall said this week at his home. “I just don’t think that dog should have a chance to get loose and hurt me or someone else again.”
During a Sept. 19 hearing in Stafford General District Court, court records show, a Stafford animal control officer recommended that Judge Bruce Strickland declare the dog, “Ike,” a vicious dog. That legal designation would have required the county to euthanize the dog.
Instead, the judge declared Ike a “dangerous” dog, a label that carries a slew of extra requirements for the dog’s owner, Eric Black, but allows the dog to live.
“That was a grave error on the judge’s part,” Marshall said.
Marshall and a younger family friend, former police officer Gail Gibson, have responded by exploring possible law changes that include immediate euthanasia for attacks that cause mutilation or worse. Gibson said she has been in touch with Del. Mark Cole, R–Spotsylvania.
Marshall also has been in contact with other neighbors to warn them about the dog that lives next door.
The saga began the afternoon of Aug. 30. Marshall said he was in his front yard when Black came down the street with his three dogs. A smaller pit bull mix was on a leash and two Great Danes, including Ike, were running freely, as usual, he said.
Both Great Danes ran toward him, but the smaller female stopped before reaching Marshall. Ike kept coming and bit Marshall in the right forearm, Marshall said.
Marshall said that Black came and retrieved the dog and a short while later, while the two men were talking, the dog charged again and bit Marshall in the upper right arm.
While both bites hurt, Marshall said he didn’t consider the injuries to be serious and he didn’t call animal control, in part because he wanted to maintain a good relationship with his neighbor.
Marshall’s wife, Nada, a former registered nurse, cleaned up the wounds and the Marshalls thought that would be the end of it.
But the next day, a neighbor saw the bite marks and asked Marshall what happened. After he told her, the neighbor called animal control and eventually handed the phone to Marshall.
Marshall said he told animal control officer Anthony McCall what had happened, but said he didn’t want to press charges. But he said McCall told him that he didn’t have a choice because he was going to be subpoenaed to court.
The day before the Sept. 19 hearing in connection with the first two bites, Marshall was in his front yard again when Black again came by with his dogs. This time, Ike was on a leash.
Marshall said he was leery of Ike because of the previous incident, but felt confident that Black had him under control as the two men again made small talk. Suddenly, Marshall said he saw a “blur” on his right and felt “excruciating” pain coming from his ear.
His hand was covered in blood after he reached for his ear and he left a bloody trail as he went into the house looking for his wife.
Nada Marshall took him to the Mary Washington Hospital emergency room, where about 60 stitches were used to close the wound. Marshall showed up the next day in court with his head covered in bandages.
Multiple visits to doctors and at least two extensive surgeries are pending to fill in the noticeable gap in Marshall’s right ear.
Contacted by telephone Wednesday, Black declined to discuss the incidents, saying, “I’ll talk to you later. Have a nice day,” before hanging up.
Stafford animal control is part of the Sheriff’s Office, and spokeswoman Amanda Vicinanzo said that while authorities sought the vicious dog designation, “We accept the determination of the judge.”
Vicinanzo said the dangerous designation carries multiple requirements, including having the dog listed on a state registry. Owners of such dogs are required to keep them muzzled and on a leash when off the owner’s property and confined when on the property. The owner must post visible warning signs about the dog’s presence and must have liability coverage of at least $100,000 covering bites, Vicinanzo said.
Vicinanzo said animal control will closely monitor the dog and, if it bites again, would confiscate the dog and charge the owner with a Class 1 misdemeanor.

LORAIN COUNTY OH - A NEIGHBOR'S PIT BULL RIPPED OFF ONE OF STEVE MAXWELL'S FINGERS AND ANOTHER ONE WAS SO BADLY DAMAGED IT HAD TO BE AMPUTATED


LORAIN COUNTY, OH (WOIO) -
A Lorain County man lost two fingers after being attacked by his neighbor's PIT BULL, according to a police report.
Steve Maxwell told police that he thought the dog was attacking his neighbor. The dog turned on him when he went to help. Maxwell says the dog tore off one finger and the other had to be amputated later at MetroHealth Hospital following the Oct. 14 incident.
According to the victim, the dog owners are in the process of being evicted from the property. The owners are not staying on the property, but the dogs are.


PALMETTO BAY FL - SYL HATFIELD, 75, SAYS IN 2 MORE SECONDS SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN DEAD AFTER AN AMERICAN BULLDOG AND A PIT BULL MIX MAULED HER AS SHE WAS TAKING A MORNING WALK



(WSVN) — An elderly woman said she is lucky to be alive after she was left wounded and scarred by two dogs from her Palmetto Bay neighborhood.

“I just kept yelling, ‘Help me! Help me!’ and I didn’t feel like I even had a voice because I was so scared,” said 75-year-old Syl Hatfield.
Hatfield’s arms, legs and feet were left covered with bruises, stitches and puncture wounds left from the Oct. 6 attack.
“I think, in two more seconds, I would have been dead because they had worked their way up. I was a rib. The were eating two ribs or four ribs, and the next was my neck,” she said.
Hatfield said she was taking a morning walk at around 7 a.m. when she was attacked. She said the dogs’ owner intervened before the ordeal turned fatal.
“Just about when they were going for the jugular, the owners came out and called them off,” she said. “It happened very quickly, and I just thought there was no way I could fight them off.”
Hatfield was later hospitalized.
Photographs taken the day of the attack show purple, swollen puncture wounds on her body.
“When you see the photos of the flesh, it looked like a hamburger or a slaughter place,” said Hatfield.
She said the dogs were  AN AMERICAN BULLDOG AND A PIT BULL MIX.
The dogs’ owners would not comment on the attack.  A sign on their home reads, “Warning — Protected by Guard Dogs.”
“There are fang marks all over, inside of me,” said Hatfield.
“This is particular,” she said pointing to her right ankle. “I realized they were out to kill when I saw them rip a piece of stuff out of my ankles.”
Hatfield remains in a rehabilitation center, where she spends her afternoon breaks on a walk with her best friend Jan Luyks.
“This was the worst thing that I’ve ever seen happen to a human by an animal,” said Luyks.
Luyks said she had spotted the American bulldog several months before Hatfield was attacked.
Luyks said the dog was following her husband. She was so concerned by what she saw that she took video of the dog as it crept closer.
“I know it’s the same dog,” said Luyks.
Hatfield said she still gets flashbacks to the morning of the attack.
“Put a price on human life, the dogs don’t come first,” she said.
Miami-Dade Animals Services said the dogs are now in their custody. The department released a statement that reads, “The two dogs involved in the severe bite incident were seized by the Miami-Dade Animal Services Department. The dogs are being held without the possibility for release during the ongoing dangerous dog investigation.”

AURORA IL - LUKE DREES-SEGUNDO, 10, WAS MAULED BY 2 PIT BULLS AS HE WALKED TO SCHOOL - THE MEAT GRINDERS RIPPED OFF HIS EAR AND LEFT DEEP GASHES IN HIS HEAD, FACE AND LEGS



On Tuesday afternoon I got a quick lesson in how loving a teacher can be.
Interviewing Kate Werner about one of her fifth-grade students at Dieterich Elementary School made my eyes well up … and not just once.
The long-time — 17 years and counting — East Aurora School District teacher had a difficult time talking about Luke Drees-Segundo, who was attacked by TWO PIT BULLS  on his way to school Friday morning and is now being treated at Loyola Medical Center for serious injuries that will require "a long road" to recovery, both physically and emotionally.
"It's been a rough day," Werner told me when I called to find out more about the online crowdfunding site she immediately set up on for Luke and his mother, Denise Drees, a waitress at Grandma's Table restaurant in Montgomery.


I believe Werner when she says "I care for every kid who comes through the doors" of the school. But Luke, she added, is "such a sweet caring soul," whose work ethic and positive attitude make him extra special. He's one of those kids, she noted, "you can count on" no matter what else is going on.
"The little guy loves school," Werner said. "Even if he doesn't always have the answer, he will step out of his comfort zone."
And it's that "can-do" attitude his teacher is counting on to help Luke recuperate from the vicious attack that ripped off one of his ears and left other deep gashes in his head, face and legs.
Despite being in considerable pain and "still traumatized by the attack ... that brave little boy still shines through" from that hospital bed, she said. "Even in the ambulance ride to the hospital, I heard he had not cried at all."


According to Aurora police, the attack took place at 9:50 Friday morning in the 1000 block of Jackson Street. His mother told me she'd given her son permission to stay home from school that day as he'd stayed up late the previous evening watching the Cubs playoff game. But he was so intent on going to class, Luke headed out anyway, even though he was running behind schedule.
Which didn't surprise those who know how much he loves school, says his mom and his teacher.
It's the 10-year-old's heart and soul that have made him a favorite with his classmates. "He's such a good friend to all the kids," Werner said. "Now it's time to pay it forward."
The entire fifth-grade at Dieterich, indeed the district itself, is rallying behind the young patient, who has already undergone rabies testing and two surgeries, including one to reattach his ear, she said. Videos, cards and books — Luke loves to read — were sent to the hospital. In addition to the YouCaring crowdfunding site Werner set up at https://www.youcaring.com/lukedreessegundo-982777.
Other possibilities to raise funds for the single mom and her family are also being explored, according to district officials.
Werner visited Luke twice since he was taken by ambulance to Loyola, including Friday evening before he underwent his first surgery; and she was already making plans to go again. But when I caught up with his mother on Tuesday evening soon after she started her shift at the restaurant, Drees told me Luke will likely be released from the hospital on Wednesday, returning again on Monday for additional surgery. A specialist will also be brought in to test for hearing loss in the damaged ear.
"He is doing much better," she said, adding that her son was able to get out of bed and play a game of Uno with his grandmother on Tuesday afternoon.
It's the support she has received from her employer, as well as from the school, Drees insists, that has helped her get through these last few days. And she's especially grateful for the "genuine love and caring" from a fifth-grade teacher who has kept in constant contact since this tragedy occurred.
"She is wonderful," said Luke's mom of Kate Werner. "What she has done .. it really is a blessing."

HAMILTON MOUNTAIN, ONTARIO CANADA - A 3-YEAR-OLD BOY ALONG WITH HIS DAYCARE WORKER WERE ATTACKED BY 3 DOGS - THE BOY SUFFERED A DEEP GASH TO THE BONE ON HIS LEG AND THE WORKER WAS BITTEN ON HER ARM AND LEG


There is a huge gash on three year old Carter LaRose’s right leg after he and his daycare worker Mary Mac were attacked by three dogs Thursday afternoon, near Upper James and Mohawk, on Hamilton mountain.
According to Mary she and Carter were walking on the sidewalk when three dogs escaped from the side door of a house, crossed the street and attacked them.
“I lifted up my boy, hold him up, I tried to kick the dogs to keep them off us but I lost my balance and fell down.”
Mary says TWO BLACK DOGS AND ONE GOLDEN DOG  attacked them. She was bitten on the arm and her leg. Carter was rushed to hospital in an ambulance and needed surgery to repair this gash.
“They had to stitch from bone up, all the muscles back together, internal stitches and the outer stitches on the skin.” Cassandra LaRose, Carter’s mom.
Animal Services is investigating the attack, in the meantime the three dogs are under quarantine at home for 10 days. They are not allowed out of the house and must be kept separate from people, but animal control won’t be able to ensure the rules are followed.
Carter is home now, bandaged up and on pain medication but his mom says it could have been worse.
“I believe my son is here right now only because she protected him. She put herself in front of him for the dogs and tried everything she could to keep the dogs away from him.”
Animal Control officials say there is no previous history with these dogs and neighbours we spoke to had nothing but good things to say about them.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

SIMCOE COUNTY, ONTARIO CANADA - AN AMERICAN BULLDOG "SOMEHOW" ESCAPED ITS HOME AND ATTACKED A 9-YEAR-OLD BOY PLAYING WITH OTHER CHILDREN OUTSIDE

A mother is urging for an AMERICAN BULLDOG to be put down after her nine-year-old son suffered serious injuries in a vicious attack.
Tania Reid said she received a phone call while at work saying that her son had to be airlifted to hospital from Simcoe County to The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto after being attacked by the bulldog close to their home in September.
She said she was “terrified” and “confused” when she saw her son Justin Reid arrive on a stretcher at the hospital.
“He was bandaged and bleeding,” she said. “He was quiet. He was probably in shock. It was something I wish I never had to see.”
“His left eyelid – his bottom portion – had been peeled away from his face. His tear duct was completely severed. At that point in time they didn’t know if they would be able to fix it. He had a gash on his left cheek by his eyebrow, (it was) quite deep.”
The child also suffered injuries to his back and arm in the incident.
After the incident, Tania Reid said the bulldog “needs to be put down” as it poses a “threat” to other children in the area.
The incident took place on the driveway of a family’s home after the dog escaped. The kids of the home frequently played outside with Justin Reid and his brother.
According to Tania Reid, the family has only owned the five-year-old bulldog for a few months so it is not known if the dog has a history of any prior attacks.
Following the attack, the dog was quarantined to be check for rabies but was later returned to the owners.
When CTV News Toronto approached the home where the dog was, the woman inside said she did not want to speak about the matter at hand.
Tania Reid said she is very happy that her son is going to be alright but still feels “very angry” about the situation.
Three weeks after the incident Justin Reid was able to return back to school in good health.
Speaking with the Ontario Provincial Police about the matter, they said a charge under the dog owner’s liability act is before the court and if convicted the owner could face a fine of up to $10,000 or six months in jail.

KENLY NC - A "FAMILY" PIT BULL CHARGED THROUGH AN OPENED DOOR OF THE HOUSE AND MAULED A 1-YEAR-OLD GIRL WHO WAS INSIDE - SHE REMAINS IN CRITICAL CONDITION AT WAKEMED


KENLY, N.C. (WNCN) – A 1-year-old girl remains in critical condition after being attacked by a family dog in Kenly Tuesday night, the Johnston County Sheriff’s Office said.
The incident occurred around 8 p.m. Tuesday in the 400 block of Old Pebble Lane.
The sheriff’s office said the family dog, a PIT BULL, was kept outside. When someone went out to feed the animal, it darted in and went after the child.
The girl remains in critical condition at WakeMed.
The dog was shot by responding deputies before Animal Control arrived. The dog was later put down by an animal control officer Tuesday night.
Ernie Wilkinson, director of Johnston County Animal Services arrived on scene shortly after deputies.
“This wasn’t a bite this was an attack,” Wilkinson said.
It is not common for law enforcement to shoot an animal, according to Wilkinson.
“Law enforcement never discharges its weapon unless it’s matter of life or death or a dire emergency. And I’m sure given the circumstances it was something like that,” he said.
A spokeswoman for the Johnston County Sheriff’s Office said deputies have not been called to the house before and as far as they know, the dog was not a “trouble animal.”
The incident comes a few weeks after a toddler was mauled by a five-year-old pit bull-mastiff mix.
Fearna Tyndall, a board member of the group “The Positive Pit Bull,” advocates on behalf of pit bulls.
“Pit bulls are inherently good dogs. They’re not naturally aggressive, and we don’t know the whole story,” she said. “I think that people who leave their dogs outside all the time chained up, they do a great disservice for people who own big dogs because those dogs do get cranky, and they do sometimes get mean.”
Tyndall rescued her pit bull, Stitch, almost eight years ago. He serves as a therapy dog, working with kids in schools.
“One of the things that I’m really careful about with my dog is making sure that he’s safe wherever he goes, and he’s not put in a position where his behavior is going to be bad,” she said.
There have been efforts in the past to ban pit bulls and other breeds of dogs in some communities in North Carolina. The ASPCA has come out against such proposals, saying there’s no evidence they’re effective at improving public safety.
Instead, the agency says it’s important to recognize the problem of dangerous dogs and hold individual owners accountable for their dogs’ actions.