Thursday, January 27, 2011

DECATUR AL - HOG-DOGGING RODEOS - ALABAMA HAD THE HIGHEST CONCENTRATION OF KNOWN FIGHTING PENS IN 2005

WHO KNEW?!  IT'S AMAZING WHAT A PERSON CAN LEARN ABOUT THE STATE THEY LIVE IN.  WE DIDN'T EVEN KNOW THIS!


http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Get+a+life+little+doggy.-a0133014071

June 1, 2005 -A bill to ban hog-dog rodeos, where pit bulls or American bulldogs are encouraged to attack hogs or feral pigs, is being considered in Alabama.  "I can tell you I have never seen anything in my life as inhumane and disturbing as this practice," says Representative  Cam Ward, a cosponsor of the bill.  Alabama has the highest concentration of known fighting pens.  The so-called rodeos feature hogs,  usually with their tusks removed, released in a pen with the dogs who go after them, biting their ears and pulling them to the ground. The contest is timed and the dogs are sometimes suited in chests armor, but both the dogs and the hogs can receive major injuries.   The new law would allow charging anyone who promotes, hosts, watches, or who supplies breeds or trains the dogs with a maximum penalty of one year in prison.  A second offense would be a felony carrying a maximum sentence of 10 years.  Louisiana recently banned hog-dog rodeos, as does Florida. Tennessee and South Carolina are considering bans.

http://blogs.kansascity.com/crime_ssscene/2006/04/no_more_hogdog_.html

Friday, Apr 14, 2006 - No more hog-dog fights in Alabama-Montgomery AL- Alabama joined Mississippi and Louisiana on Thursday in banning a backwoods fad that was growing in popularity along the Gulf Coast: trained dogs attacking penned wild hogs as spectators cheer the fastest dog.  The events, often called "hog-dog rodeos" involve putting a trained attack dog, usually a Pit Bull or American Bulldog in an enclosed ring with a wild hog that often has its tusks sawed off.

The dog chases down the hog and grabs its ear or another body part while spectators watch.  The events have been most prevalent in coastal regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, but they have been found throughout the South.  The South carolina-based International Catchdog Association says the events have been incorrectly portrayed by critics, and they are more like field trials  for the dogs.

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