Thursday, September 17, 2015

BEAUFORT COUNTY SC - A NEW ANIMAL CONTROL LAW RECEIVED INITIAL APPROVAL THIS WEEK FROM COUNTY COUNCIL - ALL PIT BULLS AND PIT BULL MIXES MUST BE SPAYED OR NEUTERED

Pit bulls and pit bull mixes that live in Beaufort County must be spayed or neutered under a new animal control law that received initial approval this week from County Council.
The controversial rule has been in the works for months because Beaufort County Animal Services is crowded with pit bulls and mixes that it struggles to adopt out and must euthanize more than any other breeds in the county shelter, animal services director Tallulah Trice said.
"It's so difficult; we just can't move them or adopt them," Trice said. "Basically, we're like a pit bull sanctuary."
Of the about 900 dogs that animal services has taken in this year, more than one third have been pit bulls or pit bull mixes, Trice said.
Now more than half of the roughly 50 dogs at the shelter are pit bulls, which is fewer thannormal after six were adopted this summer and another 18 pit bulls, mostly puppies, were transferred to Atlanta and Charleston, Trice said. At any given time, however, up to 90 percent of the shelter's dogs are pit bulls, she has said.
Most alarmingly, 64 of the 92 dogs the shelter has euthanized this year have been pit bulls or pit bull mixes, she added.
Those numbers underscore the county's breed-specific approach to the new rules, Trice and council leaders agreed.
"People may get mad we're breed specific, but it's like the S.C. Department of Natural Resources," Trice said. "They look at species of fish all the time and put (catch) limits on them ... The reason they do that is demand and supply. It's the same thing with us. We have way too much supply of pit bulls, so we have to act."
Despite some push back from state and national organizations, shelter officials and some who run local rescue groups support the breed-specific sterilization rules.
"It's needed to be revamped for a long time," said Kim Bonturi, president of the animal rescue group Chain Free Beaufort. "As a rescuer myself, I have the luxury of choosing which kind of animals to bring into the rescue group, and I cannot take in pit bulls, and it's mainly because I cannot place them."
Hilton Head Humane Association Frannie Gerthoffer agrees.
"We are behind Tallulah (Trice) and her team 100 percent," said Gerthoffer, who partners with the shelter to help spay, neuter and adopt animals. "Hilton Head Humane is committed to working just as long and just as hard to help Tallulah keep as many animals off that chopping block as possible."
The new pit bull measure is part of more comprehensive revisions to the county's animal control rules to standardize the codes across the county and municipalities, said Councilman Stu Rodman, who has shepherded the revisions in the council's Governmental Committee.
The new rules incorporate Port Royal's restrictions on keeping livestock within town limits, and Bluffton and Hilton Head Island's rules about allowing dogs off their leashes in dog parks and on the beach during certain times of the year, Rodman said.
The rules also prohibit the importation of exotic animals weighing more than 50 pounds, seemingly in direct response to the stir caused by Beaufort Liquidation owner Jeff Lowe's insistence on displaying big cats on his property off U.S. 21.
The new rules would include exemptions for accredited zoos, circuses and licensed research facilities, such as monkeys on Morgan Island, the ordinance and council members have said.
The council unanimously approved the rules in its first of three votes Monday. Council members Steve Fobes and Cynthia Bensch were absent.
Follow reporter Zach Murdock on Twitter at twitter.com/IPBG_Zach and on Facebook atfacebook.com/IPBGZach.

MOST EXCELLENT COMMENT !!!!!
The Pit Bull Lobby never stops promoting these dangerous dogs. They have#PitBullWeek , #NationalPitBullAwarenessDay. These promotions never end.
For the victims of Pit Bull attacks we would just like to have a day without a new severe and far too often fatal Pit Bull attack. Pit Bull Week has been filled with fatal, severe and dismembering Pit Bull attacks.
Could we just have a week or even a day with no medi-flights, reconstructive surgeries or even funerals. If the Pit Bull Lobby is so great and wants to promote these dogs you must first stop the severe mauling and deaths caused by them. 
You must also stop breeding them and causing shelters to be packed with a over 65% Pit Bull population (Pit Bulls only account for about 7% of the dog population). If they are such great dogs why do Pit Bull owners flood the shelters with them ? Is this love for the breed to continue breeding them for profit while shelters are full of them ? You cannot adopt your way out of this problem without increasing severe and fatal attacks, it doesn't take a genius to figure that out.
How about a day, a week dedicated to preventing breed specific attacks. If the Pit Bull Lobby wants to promote these dogs that is where they need to start, because the bullying and the cover up along with the fluff stories are not working!!  Stop complaining about and harassing those who are working to clean up your mess and clean up your own mess #PitBullLobby.




Read more here: http://www.islandpacket.com/2015/09/16/3928989_beaufort-county-council-endorses.html?rh=1#storylink=cp
normal after six were adopted this summer and another 18 pit bulls, mostly puppies, were transferred to Atlanta and Charleston, Trice said. At any given time, however, up to 90 percent of the shelter's dogs are pit bulls, she has said.
Most alarmingly, 64 of the 92 dogs the shelter has euthanized this year have been pit bulls or pit bull mixes, she added.
Those numbers underscore the county's breed-specific approach to the new rules, Trice and council leaders agreed.
"People may get mad we're breed specific, but it's like the S.C. Department of Natural Resources," Trice said. "They look at species of fish all the time and put (catch) limits on them ... The reason they do that is demand and supply. It's the same thing with us. We have way too much supply of pit bulls, so we have to act."
Despite some push back from state and national organizations, shelter officials and some who run local rescue groups support the breed-specific sterilization rules.
"It's needed to be revamped for a long time," said Kim Bonturi, president of the animal rescue group Chain Free Beaufort. "As a rescuer myself, I have the luxury of choosing which kind of animals to bring into the rescue group, and I cannot take in pit bulls, and it's mainly because I cannot place them."
Hilton Head Humane Association Frannie Gerthoffer agrees.
"We are behind Tallulah (Trice) and her team 100 percent," said Gerthoffer, who partners with the shelter to help spay, neuter and adopt animals. "Hilton Head Humane is committed to working just as long and just as hard to help Tallulah keep as many animals off that chopping block as possible."
The new pit bull measure is part of more comprehensive revisions to the county's animal control rules to standardize the codes across the county and municipalities, said Councilman Stu Rodman, who has shepherded the revisions in the council's Governmental Committee.
The new rules incorporate Port Royal's restrictions on keeping livestock within town limits, and Bluffton and Hilton Head Island's rules about allowing dogs off their leashes in dog parks and on the beach during certain times of the year, Rodman said.
The rules also prohibit the importation of exotic animals weighing more than 50 pounds, seemingly in direct response to the stir caused by Beaufort Liquidation owner Jeff Lowe's insistence on displaying big cats on his property off U.S. 21.
The new rules would include exemptions for accredited zoos, circuses and licensed research facilities, such as monkeys on Morgan Island, the ordinance and council members have said.
The council unanimously approved the rules in its first of three votes Monday. Council members Steve Fobes and Cynthia Bensch were absent.
Follow reporter Zach Murdock on Twitter at twitter.com/IPBG_Zach and on Facebook atfacebook.com/IPBGZach.

Read more here: http://www.islandpacket.com/2015/09/16/3928989_beaufort-county-council-endorses.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.islandpacket.com/2015/09/16/3928989_beaufort-county-council-endorses.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dennis Baker makes excellent points! Most pit bull owners are irresponsible. The ones that are responsible HAVE NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT! Nutters are not interested in cleaning up their own mess. They're not interested in protecting the most vulnerable in society, our children and our senior citizens. Nutters only care about themselves, and their selfish entitlements. No one needs to own a pit bull. It's not the only choice of dog out there. Nutters act like it is.

Dayna Hamilton said...

"Basically, we're like a pit bull sanctuary."

Aren't most shelters these days?

How about mandatory euthanization when they come through the door? THAT would help a little.

Cardinal said...

" The ones that are responsible HAVE NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT!"

Was that sarcastic?

Sweetie Pie said...

That's nutter love: "We'd rather see them massively killed at shelters than see them discriminated against! How dare you stop them from being born just to be killed when we dump them! We insist on our right to keeping breeding them just for an early death!"

We know nutters don't care about victims of pit bull attacks. Yet again they demonstrate that they don't care much about pit bulls either.

It's sad that what's moved Beaufort County authorities isn't the carnage this type of dog is causing among normal living things, sad that only the mass pit bull shelter deaths bothers them. But it's still progress of a sort. Let's hope this law passes despite the out-of-state crowd that will descend on the city council to bully them.