Sunday, December 6, 2015

DETROIT MI - THE DETROIT NEWS EDITORIAL: DETROIT CAN NOT LAY CLAIM TO BEING A COMEBACK CITY NOR CAN IT HOPE TO ATTRACT LARGE NUMBERS OF NEW RESIDENTS TO ITS NEIGHBORHOODS AS LONG AS CHILDREN ARE AT RISK OF BEING MAULED TO DEATH BY VICIOUS DOGS ON ITS STREETS

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That’s what happened to Xavier Strickland last week, and it is one of the most outrageous and horrifying stories to come out of Detroit in a long time. Xavier’s death should become a rallying cry to rid the city of deadly dogs.
Xavier was snatched out of his mother’s arms and torn to pieces by three pit bulls while his mother frantically tried to protect him.
“I can’t imagine the experience of his mom — to see a perfectly healthy child mauled by dogs and be completely helpless. I just can’t imagine the horror,” said Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, executive director and health officer for the Detroit Health Department, which oversees the city’s animal control department.
Strickland’s death is an outrage, but dog attacks that don’t kill people are common. Detroit ranked 13th out of the largest 30 cities for most attacks by dogs on postal workers. Parents have frequently complained that they fear for their children’s safety as they walk to school because of the number of abandoned and unrestrained dogs.
What makes this incident more appalling is that the pit bulls that attacked Xavier previously bit his 9-year-old sister. Their mother reported the incident to police. Department spokeswoman Sgt. Cassandra Lewis said the mother didn’t offer a date or location of the attack. So there was no follow up.
Animal control recently moved to the health department after reports of abuse and other problems under the police department’s oversight, and the report of the dogs seems to have happened around the time of the transition.
The negligence in dealing with the complaint proved fatal. The mother reported vicious animals threatening her children and the city did nothing.
El-Sayed, who took over the health department recently, said the problems with animal behavior and treatment in Detroit are deeply entrenched in the city’s animal culture.
“We haven’t done any community education in the past on how to treat and raise animals,” he said. Educating residents on proper ownership and licensing requirements is something the department intends to ramp up.
Stray animals remain a problem in Detroit, increasingly so in winter months. Additionally, improper keeping, feeding and the inhumane treatment of dogs result in violent interactions between them and humans.
There is an active underground breeding culture in the city; animals are improperly sold on websites. Many are trained to fight, and of course most of those are unlicensed, making tracking them even more difficult.
Dogs, particularly aggressive breeds like pit bulls, require training and proper treatment to be part of a neighborhood.
The city must step up its licensing enforcement, and deal severely with owners who allow dogs to roam free. A more intensive effort to round-up strays is also warranted.
Children face enough challenges in Detroit. The fangs of wild dogs should not be among them.

2 comments:

Sweetie Pie said...

I hope that Republicans in Michigan are aware that Republican Senator David Robertson is planning to impose BIG GOVERNMENT on Michigan municipalities -- he's pushing a bill to prohibit local communities from regulating pit bull type dogs in any way whatsoever.

Senator David Robertson, Republican, is siding with the 'progressive liberals' who think 'discriminating' against a type of dog is the same as doing that to a human being. Robertson is determined to protect the right (as he calls it) of pit bulls to keep mauling and killing, uninhibited by city or town rules.

Senator David Robertson, Republican, hasn't withdrawn his wish to impose this on us, despite the two killings pit bulls have done in only two days in Michigan. I hope voters will let him hear from us, to tell him he'll be out of the Senate next election if he persists in this perversion.

Anonymous said...

There have been several horrifying deaths by dangerous dogs in Michigan. I was just thinking today that I am going to stop being a tourist of that State if they pass that senate bill. I have traveled to Michigan on several occasions recently, including this past October. I'll take my money elsewhere.

It is disturbing when the pit bull culture is so entrenched in Michigan, that Becca's fiance, doesn't want to get rid of his pit bulls. He just lost his fiance, and the mother of his child, and he can't comprehend that pit bulls are dangerous animals? I guess because everyone is assuming that Becca went in that backyard, and therefore deserved to be killed? From what witnesses are saying, she was dragged in the yard. Since that exact thing happened to a little boy the day before she was killed, is it that hard to believe?

If Becca was upset, it's quite possible she was running, or at least moving in a hurried manner. That would excite any dog. My dog does that when I hurriedly try and answer the door, the phone, or whatever. With a pit bull, it would be very easy to grab its attention, and not in a good way. Becca was barefoot, and fleeing an argument. People that are fighting are not calm and collected. Basically, a pit bull target. But let's blame the victim, again, instead of the breed. This is all normal "dog" behavior.

VOMITS