Thursday, December 17, 2015

PARADISE MOUNTAIN, SAN DIEGO COUNTY CA - IN 2009 SEVERAL RESIDENTS SAY THEY WERE IN "PIT BULL HELL" AND THEY WERE SLEEPING WITH RIFLES NEXT TO THEIR BEDS AFTER BEING TERRORIZED BY NIGHTTIME ATTACKS ON THEIR ANIMALS - THE RECENT ATTACKS ARE SIMILAR TO THOSE ATTACKS THAT OCCURRED IN 2009


A mule was severely wounded by the animal attacks and later had to be euthanized.

A series of animal deaths in the Paradise Mountain area that occurred in November are eerily similar to PIT BULL ATTACKS  that occurred in 2009.
In late November an animal attack on Paradise Mountain resulted in SEVERAL DEAD SHEEP AND CHICKENS. This was followed a week later by another ATTACK ON A DONKEY that resulted in injuries so severe that it had to be euthanized. Dr. Mathews, a local veterinarian who examined the donkey, said the wounds were consistent with an attack by dogs.
These incidents remind Paradise Mountain residents of those that happened in January 2009 when a PACK OF PIT BULLS MAULED A MINIATURE HORSE  and were dragging it out of the corral when chased off by the horse’s owners, Jan and Robin Hansen.
A month later THE PIT BULLS KILLED TWO DOGS  belonging to Domingo Ortega on his avocado grove on Sunset Vista Lane.
Now four years later it is Ortega’s SHEEP THAT WERE KILLED AND THE DONKEY, owned by Rosanna Thompson was on her property on Sunset Vista Lane above Ortega’s orchard.
Thompson said, “We are, of course, devastated by the loss.”
It is across the street from where the Hansen’s PONY WAS ATTACKED in 2009.
Paradise Mountain is a neighborhood in the hills east of Valley Center next to San Pasqual Indian Reservation.
The Roadrunner covered the 2009 attacks, reporting: “Several residents of the Paradise Mountain area, terrorized by nighttime attacks over several weeks by a pack of dogs, say they are in ‘pit bull hell. Some are sleeping with rifles next to their beds.”
At the time the problem was that the owners of the dogs lived on the reservation. A Sheriff’s sergeant stationed in VC told The Roadrunner in 2009: “Everyone seems to be in agreement that the dogs are from the reservation. By the time the deputies … arrived in the area, the dogs were gone on this incident. We CAN do something about the dogs (capture & transport) when they are off the reservation. . .The manner in which our ‘hands are tied’ is when we deal with the dogs ON the reservation. Sovereign land and all that.”
The law says that when dogs enter your property to attack your livestock or other property that you are within your rights to shoot them, no matter where they come from.
County officials can, of course, capture and keep animals that are trespassing, even if they are from the reservation.

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