Tuesday, March 31, 2015

PRYING THE PIT OFF



https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=277&v=drUOy_bXhCA

NORWICH CT - NORWICH BULLETIN: OPINION - "THOSE OF US WHO CHOOSE NOT TO OWN DANGEROUS DOG BREEDS SHOULD NOT BE FORCED TO SUBSIDIZE THOSE WHO DO"


  • Posted Mar. 22, 2015 at 2:01 AM 


    There’s legislation (HB 5361) headed for a vote in the House, forcing insurance companies to cover people who choose to own dangerous dog breeds and prohibit higher premiums for owners of dangerous dog breeds. Insurance company representatives testified that rates will go up for all policy holders, regardless of whether they own a poodle, a pit bull or no dog at all, if this bill becomes law.
    Rates will skyrocket for property management companies, homeowners and individuals with renters insurance. Even worse, disfiguring and fatal maulings will increase as those who choose to own dangerous dog breeds will be free to do so, and be fully insured.
    On average, more than 30 Americans per year suffered fatal dog attacks over the past 10 years. In 62 percent of cases, pit bulls were responsible. More than one-third of homeowners’ liability claims involve dog bites. A single claim can cost $500,000 or more. If HB 5361 becomes law, dog-related claims will enter the stratosphere.
    This is a classic case of special interests running over the silent majority. Those of us who choose not to own dangerous dog breeds — in other words, the majority — should not be forced to subsidize those who do.
    LIZ MARSDEN
    Chaplin
    http://www.norwichbulletin.com/article/20150322/OPINION/150329957/2011/OPINION

MODESTO CA - THE MODESTO BEE EDITORIAL: DO WE HAVE THE RIGHT TO PROTECT OURSELVES FROM VICIOUS DOGS?

EDITORIAL: THE MODESTO BEE

The man who owned two pit bulls that attacked a Texas man in 2011 had this sign posted on his property.


Should we have the right to protect ourselves from vicious dogs? Or do we just roll over, play dead and refuse to speak up because the misguided pit bull lobby makes a lot of noise?

Last October, 54-year-old Juan Fernandez of Modesto was mauled to death in his own backyard by a pack of four aggressive dogs that everyone – including the sheriff’s deputies who killed them – described as pit bulls. His 77-year-old mother tried to rescue him and just barely escaped with critical injuries.

With her son dead, Maria Fernandez left the state; it’s doubtful she will ever return. The owners of the vicious dogs left town, too.

Sheriff Adam Christianson told us in November that charges against the dogs’ owners were unlikely; there had been no prior complaints, and he could not show negligence. District Attorney Birgit Fladager, citing the same reasons, said recently charges won’t be filed.

We’re not lawyers, but this seems like a crime. That it will go unpunished leaves us both outraged and frustrated. If law enforcement can do nothing, then we must do something. Why? Because the attacks continue.

Two weeks ago, the face of a 40-year-old woman in Pinole was ripped off by her 9-year-old pet pit bull. A neighbor told sfgate.com the pit bull “had a kind, loving temperament … it must have snapped.”

                                         Must have snapped.

Two pit bulls snapped in downtown Stockton last week, attacking two men and killing a cat. When a police officer responded, they appeared to work in tandem, circling and lunging at him before they were shot.
The Stockton victims were lucky.

The website dogsbite.org attributed 27 fatalities to pit bulls in 2014. That was up from 25 in 2013. From 2005 to 2014, pit bulls accounted for 203 deaths – or 62 percent of the total number of people killed by dogs. Yet, pit bulls make up only 6 percent of the total dog population.

A woman out for a run was killed in Stockton last year. A 40-year-old man was killed by his pet pit bull in Indiana; a 64-year-old woman was killed by four dogs in her backyard; an 83-year-old woman killed by her granddaughter’s four pit bulls; a toddler was killed by her grandmother’s pit bull. There’s more.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a 20-year study ending in 2000, and found that two-thirds of all fatal dog bites came from either pit bulls or Rottweilers. Mostly pit bulls.

It’s harder to protect ourselves in California than other states, but here’s how we start:
First, since 2005 cities and counties have been allowed to require that pit bulls and other aggressive breeds be spayed or neutered. Ripon and Manteca already have these laws. Stanislaus County and all its cities should follow suit.

Second, the 2004 state law authored by Tom Hayden that disallows “breed-specific” laws should be repealed. That would allow cities and counties to mandate specific outdoor enclosures such as cement-floored, five-sided chain-link-fence kennels. It would allow limits on the number of large dogs as opposed to smaller dogs. It could require muzzles based on breed or size.

Stanislaus County executive Stan Risen fears “over-regulation”; we fear encountering dogs not properly muzzled, confined or restrained.

What’s worse? Forcing owners of aggressive dogs to responsibly care for their animals by following a few extra rules, or burying another of our neighbors?

Assembly Republican leader Kristin Olsen told The Bee’s editorial board that she wants to prohibit criminals from owning pit bulls. “There’s a plethora of evidence that pit bulls in the hands of convicted criminals are being used as weapons,” she said. But Olsen admits pit bull owners are vocal. And often being vocal is enough to scare off good laws.

You don’t have the right to own a lion, bobcats or leopards. The same is true for gorillas, crocodiles, alligators, cobras, mambas and sharks. Owning pet bears and rattlesnakes is illegal. Yet the number of people killed in the U.S. by all of these animals combined each year is about half the number killed by pit bulls.

So why is it that local jurisdictions can outlaw all of the above as pets, but can’t outlaw the deadliest of them all?

After our last editorial concerning pit bulls, we got more than 500 emails – most polite, some rude, one or two threatening. Most accused us of wanting to discriminate against their favorite breed. They’re right; we do want to discriminate. Dogs are not people; there’s nothing illegal or immoral about discriminating against dangerous dogs – or any dangerous animal. It’s done all the time and for good reason.

Their angry denunciations are at once self-serving and irrelevant. Besides, few of those emails came from people living in this area.

But we do live here. And it’s time for our county supervisors and City Council members to join their counterparts in Ripon and Manteca and pass laws to provide at least a modicum of protection from dangerous dogs. Require pit bulls and aggressive breeds to be neutered, then require them to be muzzled and properly caged.




Read more here: http://www.modbee.com/opinion/editorials/article15374450.html#storylink=cpy

HOUSTON TX - CHARLES DAVID JORDAN, 63, WAS HONORED BY THE CARNEGIE HEROES FUND COMMISSION FOR SAVING THE LIFE OF MONICA GARZA WHEN SHE WAS ATTACKED BY 2 PIT BULLS

A Houston man is among the 20 people being honored with medals and cash from the Pittsburgh-based Carnegie Heroes Fund Commission. Charles David Jordan, 63, of Houston, saved a 34-year-old woman from being mauled by two pit bulls on a jogging trail in March 2014. / handout

A Houston man is among the 20 people being honored with medals and cash from the Pittsburgh-based Carnegie Heroes Fund Commission. Charles David Jordan, 63, of Houston, saved a 34-year-old woman from being mauled by two pit bulls on a jogging trail in March 2014.



Monica Garza felt she couldn't go on any further. After almost 10 minutes struggling against a pair of attacking pit bulls, she was about to give up.
"Every time I got up to run away, they would bite me and drag me back down," Garza recalled Monday, about a year after the attack on a southeast Houston jogging path.
"I was thinking to myself this was going to be my way to go. I felt I had fought as much as I could," she said.
Then she saw a man coming around the corner who would turn out to be her rescuer: Charles Jordan, a 63-year-old retired database manager for AT & T. "If he hadn't showed up when he did, I would not be here today," she said.
Jordan's house is close to the jogging trail near Hughes and Riverstone Ranch Road where Garza, 34, was attacked March 5, 2014.
Although Jordan doesn't call himself a hero, on Monday he was among 20 people nationwide recognized as one by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission.
"I didn't do anything that anyone else wouldn't do," Jordan said Monday after learning that he had been awarded the Carnegie Hero Medal.
The medal recognizes people who risk their lives "to an extraordinary degree" while saving or attempting to save the lives of others, according to the foundation. The recipients are nominated for the medal, and they receive a financial award as well.
"I'm honored and astonished - overwhelmed would be a good word," Jordan said. "It's totally unexpected."
Garza saw the two dogs while she was jogging. She still remembers them locking their eyes on her. Garza grabbed her cellphone and called 911.
"All I could get out was my name. I was being attacked at that time," she said. "All (the 911 operator) could hear were screams for help."
Jordan's wife told him she heard someone screaming somewhere outside. He went outside to investigate and saw the dogs hovering over Garza's body.
"One had her arm and one had her leg. They were literally tearing her apart," Jordan said.
Jordan had left his walking stick in the house but still ran at the dogs, flinging himself on top of them. For a moment, they released their grip on Garza and started biting him.
"I said, 'Get up and run' and she said, 'I can't,' " Jordan said. "Then they let go of me and went back to her."
Jordan picked up one of the dogs that then bit him in the face.
"I threw him and landed on him but he came out from under me," Jordan said.
He continued fighting the dogs, kicking them, punching them, trying to choke them with their collars. Nothing he could do seemed to faze them. With each defense, they countered with additional attacks.
Jordan threw himself over Garza's body to shield her from the marauding animals. He spotted a nearby electrical power box as the dogs continued biting him.
"I said, 'We have to get on top of that. We have to get off the ground,' " Jordan recalled.
Placing himself between her and the dogs, Jordan helped the heavily bleeding woman climb the power box.
"When she saw the extent of her injuries, she went into shock," he said.
Jordan said one of the dogs came at his wife when she arrived. He said she went back around the corner and started screaming. He said it seemed to distract the dogs. Once the two pit bulls were separated, they seemed to give up the attack. Animal control officers finally arrived at the scene, he said.
The dogs were later put down by a court order, he said.
Garza spent more than a month in the hospital and still has additional medical procedures in her future. Jordan was treated for his injuries and has since recovered.
Garza said she will always have a bond with Jordan. She has called him at least once a month since the attack.
"I am extremely proud of him and thankful he was chosen for this award," she said. "I think he deserves it more than anyone in this world."

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Houston-man-honored-for-rescuing-woman-in-pit-6169196.php


HIGHLAND CA - 3 PIT BULLS - OOPS! I MEAN AMERICAN STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIERS GOT LOOSE NEAR AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL AND CAUSED QUITE A LOT OF DRAMA

 Two people were injured early Tuesday when three dogs reportedly bit two people and caused some cautious moments at a local school before the PIT BULLS were seized.
A 58-year-old man was jogging near the school when he was attacked by the dogs, according to the man’s wife. He was bitten in the face, hands and arms, however he refused medical treatment and opted to drive himself to the hospital.
San Bernardino Animal Control officers seized the three dogs.......

                                     ONE OF WHICH WAS MUZZLED
The dogs’ owner, Colleen Cantwell, of Highland, said she believed her gate was left open by San Bernardino Police officers after they visited her home last night. She said the older dog and father of the two others....

SKIPPY, HAD BEEN MUZZLED BECAUSE THE DOG WOULD SOMETIMES ATTACK HIS OWN 8-YEAR-OLD PUP, WALTER.

Cantwell said the dogs were American Staffordshire Terriers.  Initial reports indicate the dogs may have also bitten an older woman near Marshall Boulevard and Arden Avenue before 8 a.m., but it doesn’t appear the woman required immediate medical attention.
Initial reports were that Belvedere Elementary students were kept inside their classrooms Tuesday as San Bernardino Animal Control officers searched the area for the dogs. But district officials said later that the incident did not disrupt the normal school day. After contacting Animal Control, the school’s principal and other employees carefully monitored the arrival of students to the campus.
But there was no lockdown, according to district spokeswoman Linda Bardere.

ALBUQUERQUE NM - STORIES OF 2 PIT BULLS DECLARED AGGRESSIVE/DANGEROUS THAT WERE ALLOWED TO GO BACK IN THE COMMUNITY TO BITE AND KILL AGAIN - THEN WERE GIVEN TO RESCUE GROUPS THAT PUT THEM ONCE AGAIN BACK IN NEIGHBORHOODS

http://www.abqjournal.com/562534/news/stories-of-two-dogs-that-killed.htm

MUGSY MALONE

“A pit bull named Mugsy Malone was officially declared dangerous even before he attacked a 3-year-old girl. The dog has twice come and gone from our animal shelters. The attack on the child was not enough to warrant euthanasia under our practices. Neither was the fact that Mugsy Malone killed a small dog and also bit a man in our own facility.
One day, while Mugsy Malone was outdoors, a man came along with a small dog. “No, no! Close the gate! Don’t come in!” the caregiver yelled. But it was too late. Mugsy Malone saw the dog and killed it, even as the owner of the dog tried to save his little friend by fighting Mugsy Malone to no avail.
Mugsy Malone was declared to be a dangerous dog. Then, last year, he saw a little girl playing outside. Mugsy Malone ran to the little girl and attacked her, grabbing her on the face. The father leaped into the attack and tried to pry the dog’s mouth from his daughter’s face. The father grabbed a rock and began hitting Mugsy Malone on the head to save the child.
The girl was taken to a hospital, and Mugsy Malone was taken to the West Side Animal Shelter and later to a veterinary clinic. At the clinic, while the dog was being sedated, an officer had to stand by Mugsy Malone, holding him with a cable stick until the dog passed out.
Back at our animal shelter, about six weeks later, a volunteer decided to take Mugsy Malone for a walk. The volunteer reached into the kennel so he could put a leash on the dog. Mugsy Malone bit the volunteer’s arm and scratched the volunteer with his teeth. The volunteer was taken to our clinic, where the volunteer’s arm was scrubbed for about 10 minutes before being bandaged and wrapped. A note was added to the dog’s file, advising that Mugsy Malone should not be walked by anyone, to avoid another incident.
(Mugsy Malone was given to an out-of-town animal group last September).”
A pit bull mix named Pappy appeared on a local animal rescue website that notes the dog isn't good with other dogs or cats. The dog was involved in killing a former shelter poodle and biting its owner after its adoption from the city animal shelter.

PAPPY

“Eight years ago, a little dog named Lienda was turned over to a city animal shelter. There was something medically wrong with Lienda and its owner could not afford the expense of veterinary care.
Our staff fell in love with Lienda. They believed Lienda was so cute that she could easily be adopted if they could only save her life. It appeared there was an intestinal blockage. Our veterinarians discussed it and they decided to operate on Lienda to see if the blockage could be removed. If not, the plan was to euthanize Lienda; she would not wake up from surgery.
Dr. John Romeo performed the operation and he was able to save the little dog. “Wagging tail,” a medical note said as Lienda began to recover from surgery. And, just as expected, Lienda was quickly adopted into a loving home.
Three months ago, Lienda was horribly killed by a pit bull named Pappy, who had recently been released from a city animal shelter despite a history of aggression and repeatedly failing behavioral tests. During the attack, Pappy also bit Lienda’s owner when she tried to save her beloved little friend.
After the killing, Pappy was returned to the animal shelter and I personally put him on a euthanasia list for public safety reasons. However, by the end of the day, Pappy had been removed from the euthanasia list on orders of the department director. Later, the director approved giving Pappy to a rescue group, who recently arranged for Pappy to be adopted by a family living on the West Side of Albuquerque.”
These excerpts are from a complaint written by Jim Ludwick, of the Animal Welfare Department.

http://www.abqjournal.com/562535/news/is-city-releasing-dangerous-dogs.html

KNOXVILLE TN - A "BULLDOG" ATTACKED A 78-YEAR-OLD WOMAN WHO WAS WALKING ON THE TURKEY CREEK GREENWAY TO HELP HER RECOVER FROM KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY



A dog owner, whose bulldog attacked a 78-year-old woman on a Farragut greenway, has come forward after his wife saw the story on WBIR.
According to the daughter of the victim, the owner has turned the English Bulldog over to animal control.
The attack happened on the Turkey Creek Greenway in Farragut late Saturday morning.
Susan McGrath, 78, was walking by herself along the greenway. It's a walk she takes nearly everyday, as she continues to recover from a full-right-knee replacement surgery she had in November.
When she passed a man walking a 60-to-80 pound English bulldog, McGrath told the owner, "You've got a beautiful dog."
The owner replied, "He's a rescue dog, and he's 13 years old."
As McGrath passed the two, she said the dog jumped on her. The owner still had him on the leash and tried to pull the dog down, but the dog jerked his head out of his collar, knocked her down and tried to attack her face.
Raising a now-heavily-bandaged arm, McGrath continued.
"So I put my arm up, and he just bit right through my arm and he wouldn't let go, and so the man came over and pulled him off," she said.
The owner told her to run, so McGrath - recovering right knee and all - ran to the nearest building, which happened to be CarMax, where she found employee Mike Blair.
"It was pretty obvious that she was very shaken up," Blair recounted. "She had on a jacket and was holding her arm, and you could see puncture wounds in the jacket arm, so it was obvious that she had been attacked by something."
On Monday afternoon, McGrath stopped by CarMax with a thank-you card for Blair, who drove McGrath to the emergency room Saturday and stayed with her until a family friend could arrive, since McGrath's three children were all out of town at the time.
"I thought I was going to die," McGrath said with a laugh, hugging Blair Monday afternoon.
McGrath received treatment for a deep and gaping bite wound on her right forearm, inflicted despite the heavy, water-resistant jacket she wore.
"All the blood had pooled on the inside of the coat, so I can't imagine what would've happened to her arm had she not had this coat on. It's very scary," McGrath's daughter Debby Thompson said Monday afternoon during her mom's doctor visit.
"He mauled my mother's arm. I mean, there was a big. . . hole in her arm, and had that been a kid--" Thompson said, pausing as she grew emotional. "It was just really scary."
The family filed a report, but when deputies returned to the greenway, they found no sign of the man or his dog.
"When you don't know whether a dog is rabid or not, you have to presume that it could be rabid and then treat," McGrath's doctor Charles Clark said, "because without treatment, hardly anybody survives rabies."
After watching the newscast, the owner did come forward. He told police that his dog has never attacked anyone before that incident. The man did have papers on the dog, which shows the animal doesn't have rabies.
But to be sure, the man handed the dog over to police. Officials will quarantine the bulldog for 10 days to ensure that the animal doesn't have rabies. Afterwards, the animal will be put down.

NORFOLK VA - TWO ADULTS AND TWO CHILDREN WERE ATTACKED BY 3 PIT BULL MIXES THAT GOT LOOSE


NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) — A 10-year-old boy was taken to a local hospital after a dog attack in Norfolk late Monday night.
Emergency dispatchers got a 911 call around 7:30 p.m. regarding three “vicious” pit bulls in the 800 block of Johnstons Road, according to Officer Daniel Hudson, a Norfolk Police Department spokesman. That’s in the Chesapeake Gardens neighborhood.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
The incident involved three dogs that bit two adults and two children. Hudson said three of the victims were treated and released at the scene for dog bite wounds. One 10-year-old boy was taken to the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters for wounds that were also not life-threatening.
WAVY News’ Liz Palka spoke to one of the victims, Jarrod Holmes. He said his neighbor and neighbor’s girlfriend heard screaming and looked out their window. At first they thought kids were playing with dogs, but then realized the children were being attacked. That’s when they got Holmes to help.
“I happened to have a bat right there. We went over, he picked up one of the kids off the ground, put them on the back of the car and the other kids  followed,” Holmes said. “And the dog started coming back so we placed ourselves between the dogs and the kids, and they were growling, and they came up and one got me in the abdomen and up on the neck and then he hit him with the bat.”
Holes said there were five children being bothered by the dogs, but didn’t know if all were injured. After they ran away, Holmes said the dogs attacked another man down the street. That man had a large bandage up and down his forearm.
The dogs’ owner told WAVY.com they are pit bull mixes and are between two and five years of age. She said they were penned up in her backyard and somehow got out. She said the dogs are “family dogs” and that they had never been vicious before.
Hudson said all three dogs are currently under a 10-day quarantine and will be transported to the Norfolk Animal Shelter. Norfolk Humane Officers are investigating the incident.



JACKSON TN - A FAMILY'S ROTTWEILER ATTACKED A 72-YEAR-OLD GRANDMOTHER - A NEIGHBOR TRIED TO COME TO HER AID BUT THE "FAMILY'S PIT BULL" WOULD NOT LET HER GET CLOSE

Monday, a 72-year-old woman was still in the hospital after being attacked by THE FAMILY ROTTWEILER Sunday afternoon, according to neighbors.

Tawanna Wright said she heard screams from her neighbor's front yard. When she rushed out she saw her elderly neighbor being mauled by the family's rottweiler. She said the attack lasted at least 15 minutes, during which she tried to distract the rottweiler. Then the family's other dog, a pit bull, would not let her get close. That is when she called 911.

"It was nerve-racking. The rottweiler had blood dripping from its mouth. I think everybody was a little freaked out," said Wright.

She said the victim's grandson returned home, and was able to get both dogs inside. She said she saw the victim had about 50 bite marks on her arms, and was rushed to the emergency room.

Residents said they are thankful no children out on spring break were nearby when the incident happened.

"I'm just glad that none of the kids actually, got hurt that live in the neighborhood." said Carla Davis, who lives across the street from where the incident allegedly occurred. 

Wright said she could not imagine what would have happened if they had not heard the victim's cries for help.

"I'm thankful I actually heard her, and I could get to her," said Wright. 

An Animal Control officer said the dog will be held at Rabies Control for 10 days to determine if it has the virus. Afterward, the family can request its return.

http://www.wbbjtv.com/news/local/Family-dog-attacks-elderly-woman-298084921.html


Monday, March 30, 2015

CHESTERFIELD COUNTY VA - THE PIT BULLS BELIEVED TO BE RESPONSIBLE FOR KILLING A NEIGHBOR'S GOATS ARE IN TROUBLE AGAIN AS ONE OF THE DOGS ATTACKED A GIRL GETTING OFF A SCHOOL BUS AND THEY ALSO KILLED ANOTHER NEIGHBOR'S POODLE


A Chesterfield man and his pit bulls are back in the news after at least one of his dogs bit a 13-year-old girl and killed a neighbor’s poodle.
“They probably would have killed her out there,” said Hazel Scott, who said that her granddaughter had to have 17 stitches after one of the dogs bit her leg.
CBS 6 reporter Joe St. George questioned the dogs’ owner, William Branch, Monday afternoon.
Branch reiterated that his dogs did not kill any goats, but admitted that the dogs did kill a poodle and bit the 13-year-old.
Branch called both incidents accidents and said that the animals were playing with the poodle when things went wrong.
When asked if his dog attacked the child when she got off the bus, he said, “As far as I know, yes he did.” But he also said that the incident may have been prompted by the 
                 CHOPPING DOWN OF A NEARBY TREE.
“I think the cutting down of the tree aggregated the dogs and they became aggressive,” Branch explained.
Branch promised to compensate the poodle’s owners for her loss.
dogs
Following the two attacks, Branch maintained that his dogs should not be taken away from him. Two of his five dogs are currently in quarantine by the county as he prepares for court hearings.
“I don’t feel they bit this child  because they are vicious or dangerous, because there not that way,” Branch added.
Additionally, Branch said that he feels targeted and said that the county has been “out to get him” for years.
“Each time they come, they come with the police,” Branch said. “As if I am a criminal and I’m scared of these people.”
But neighbor Sierra Watkins just wants justice after her grandma lost her beloved poodle.
“We are being terrorized. This needs to stop,” Watkins said.

CHANDLER, HENDERSON COUNTY TX - A PIT BULL THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE SECURED AND IN QUARANTINE FOR BITING 2 MEN WAS ALLOWED OUTSIDE AND ATTACKED 2 MORE PEOPLE

Howard Joiner talks about the pit bull that attacked him and his daughter. (Source: KLTV Staff)
The Henderson County sheriff's department arrested Chandler resident, Scott Dick, whose dog attacked a father and daughter last week. The attack happened last Friday in the 4900 block of Lost Pine Drive in Chandler.
Fifty-eight year old Dick is charged with a failure to quarantine his pit bull, after the dog bit both Dick and another man on March 21.
Seven days after the first incident, Howard Joiner and Ashley Tate-Joiner, were at Dick's home to borrow some coffee creamer.
Ashley followed Dick into his gated yard when his pit bull emerged from the home.
Howard Joiner, who was waiting in his truck, heard his daughter scream for help.
“The dog was going for her throat, she threw her arm up to protect herself, and the dog caught her arm.” said Joiner. “That's when he wouldn't let go.”
Joiner, who has difficulty walking, ran from his truck.
“I was more worried about her dying, at that point.” said Joiner.
AFTER ABOUT 8 MINUTES, JOINER SAID HE WAS ABLE TO WRESTLE THE DOG FROM ASHLEY, BUT THE CANINE LATCHED ONTO HIS RIGHT HAND. "AFTER 20 MINUTES OR MORE OF FIGHTING THAT DOG, I COULDN'T HOLD HIM ANY LONGER," JOINER SAID.  "IT WAS ON A MISSION TO KILL.  THERE WAS NOT DOUBT ABOUT WHAT HE WAS GOING TO DO--HE WAS GOING TO KILL SOMETHING."
Another neighbor in the Chandler community pointed a pistol at the dog, and fired twice.
“I said 'shoot the dog, shoot the dog…I can't hold him anymore,'” said Joiner. “When the neighbor shot, he accidentally shot me.”
Howard Joiner said the injuries to his left hand may be permanent. (Source: KLTV Staff)
A shot that killed the dog and shattered the bone in Joiner's left hand. Joiner said the likelihood that he'll be able to use his left hand in in the future is unlikely.
"The accident part of him shooting me, I'm not upset about that." Joiner said about the unidentified man.  "He made an effort where no one else would. He saved my life."
Chief Deputy Botie Hillhouse of the Henderson County Sheriff's Department said the dog was supposed to be under a 10-day quarantine and secured by the owner following the March 21 incident.
“The state allows a homeowner, as long as the rabies documentation is in order, to quarantine their dog at their residence and not at a licensed facility.” said Hillhouse.
An option that Joiner thinks a dog owner should not have after a dog bites a human.
“Why was the dog not put down, or at least put in a place that was safe?” Joiner said of the homeowner's option to take the dog home. “Why was he left with someone who couldn't control him to begin with?”
Deputy Hillhouse said that in light of this incident, the sheriff's department is considering changing its policies regarding dogs that attack or bite people.
The policy change would include making it mandatory that those dogs be quarantined in a licensed facility only and not at home with the owner.



BROWARD COUNTY FL - SUN-SENTINEL OPINION BY GARY STEIN: "SHOULD PIT BULL OWNERS FACE TOUGH RESTRICTIONS?

 http://www.sun-sentinel.com/opinion/todays-buzz/sfl-should-pit-bull-owners-face-tough-restrictions-20150330-story.html

It was two years ago that the Broward County Commission considered some kind of a ban on pit bulls. And then they didn’t.  Pit bull lovers showed up at the county commissioner chambers with their dogs in tow, in a real display of intimidation.

The thought of banning pit bulls, or putting more restrictions on them, was dropped. The issue needs to be revisited, in the wake of the vicious attack on a mother and her son in Fort Lauderdale, by a Cane Corso-pit bull terrier mix. 

 It would be difficult to ban pit bulls totally, because of a state law against breed-specific bans.  Miami-Dade bans pit bulls, but they got that law passed before the state restriction.  But it is time to put heavy burdens on pit bull owners.  There are a zillion breeds of dog.  The pit bull happens to do the most damage.

If you want a pit bull, it should be muzzled when you are outside.  Leash laws should be vigorously enforced.  And there  should be a requirement of a huge insurance policy— half a million, one million whatever. Something large enough to make it difficult.  If you want to own a pit bull, those are the kinds of restrictions you should have. 

Yes, I know they are cuddly, wonderful pets and wouldn’t hurt a fly.  Ask the mother and her son in Fort Lauderdale about that. What do you think? Should pit bull owners face tough restrictions?

Gary Stein can be reached at gstein@sunsentinel.com. On Twitter@SSEditorial.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fort-lauderdale/fl-broward-dog-bite-upate-20150330-story.html



PRYING THE PIT OFF - BUT NOT BEFORE HE TAKES A MANS LEG OFF WHILE THE "MEN" LAUGH AND LAUGH AND LAUGH AND MOCK THE VICTIM



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnUdFXT9w6Y&feature=share&list=PLe9YZDQL7jJx6h2ujWp4Me0rKmqq9899y&index=135

Uploaded on Oct 20, 2008
the dog starts off playfull but soon turns nasty as you will see.......

Sunday, March 29, 2015

STATEN ISLAND NY - A WOMAN WHOSE ARM WAS MANGLED IN A PIT BULL ATTACK 2 YEARS AGO HAS SETTLED FOR $450,000



STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A 66-year-old woman, whose arm was mangled in a pit bull attack two years ago on a Dongan Hills street, has accepted a $450,000 settlement, said her lawyer.

Lucille Fundaro suffered severe injuries to her arm, requiring extensive surgery and agonizing skin grafts, said her lawyer, Anthony L. Ameduri.  The terrifying attack occurred on Aug. 24, 2013, on Dumont Avenue, a quiet residential street, according to court papers and Advance reports.

In a hospital interview afterward, Ms. Fundaro, a New Dorp resident, told the Advance she was attending a barbecue on Dumont when she left to greet a friend across the street.
That's when she saw a pit bull charge at her, she said.

Ms. Fundaro, whose home had been battered 10 months earlier by Hurricane Sandy, said she stood her ground as the dog tore a thick chunk of flesh from the underside of her right forearm, exposing the bone.

A second, smaller pit bull then came over and began sniffing a piece of her flesh, which the larger dog had ripped from her forearm and had dropped on the pavement, she said.
The smaller dog's actions distracted the larger dog, allowing her to escape and quite possibly saving her life, Ms. Fundaro told the Advance.

Ms. Fundaro was treated at Staten Island University Hospital, Ocean Breeze, where she underwent several surgeries and skin grafts, said Ameduri.

She alleged the defendants failed to control and maintain the dogs, which, according to neighbors, had vicious propensities, Ameduri said.

The suit was filed in state Supreme Court, St. George, and was recently settled with the defendants' insurance carrier before trial, said Ameduri, a partner in the West Brighton firm Ameduri, Galante, D'Agostino & Friscia.



Saturday, March 28, 2015

FORT LAUDERDALE FL - AN UNNAMED BREED DOG RAN LOOSE IN A NEIGHBORHOOD AND ATTACKED A BOY AND HIS MOTHER


THIS ARTICLE SAYS THE GRIPPER WAS A CANE CORSO/PIT BULL MIX !!!

A WITNESS IN THIS VIDEO SAYS IT WAS A PIT BULL !!!

When a dog pounced on a boy and began biting him, the child's relatives and a neighbor rushed to the boy's aid, witnesses say. They beat the dog with a skateboard, broom and belt — anything they could find — to stop the animal Saturday afternoon. Yet the canine was difficult to fend off. The attack sent the boy and an adult relative, both of whom suffered bite wounds, to the hospital.

"The dog just kept going back to the kid and attacking the kid," said Larry Szpyra, 64, a neighbor who heard the screams and witnessed the attack. "Just a nasty situation."

It happened about 3 p.m. Saturday in the 1800 block of Southwest 43rd Avenue in Broadview Park, an unincorporated neighborhood west of Fort Lauderdale. The names of the dog-bite victims haven't been released, so their latest conditions were unavailable. Neighbors said the boy is about 9 or 10 years old.

"The adult sustained more serious injuries than the child," said Mike Jachles, a spokesman for Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue. 

Szpyra lives across the street from where the attack happened. He saw the dog dart down the road and head straight for a boy riding his bike in his driveway, he said. "No provocation whatsoever," Szpyra said. "The dog just attacked the little boy and jumped on his back. I don't know how badly he was bitten but he started screaming."  

The boy's sister grabbed a skateboard and started hitting the dog, trying to stop the attack, Szpyra said. A woman, believed by neighbors to be the boy's mother, used a broom handle to also hit the animal. Their efforts weren't enough. The dog kept attacking, neighbors said.

Donna Hartog, 68, another neighbor, said she heard the child's mother scream. The dog's mouth was covered in what appeared to be blood, she said.

                     "The mouth was totally red," she said.

A 21-year-old neighbor heard the screams and ran out of his home to help everyone. He used a belt to hit the dog, neighbors said. The 21-year-old man's father, Jean Justine, said his son only suffered a scratch while helping. The dog followed Justine's son to Justine's home.

"When my son saw that dog again, he got inside" the home, Justine said. "The dog was really crazy."

At some point, a woman drove up to where the dog was and took the animal away. "She must have been looking for him, knowing he was loose," Hartog said. "She's screaming, 'Stop beating the dog! Stop beating the dog!'"

Woman, child attacked by dog near Fort Lauderdale

Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue said the agency's central Broward units responded to assist the child and adult who suffered the dog-bite wounds. The patients were taken to Broward Health Medical Center.

After the dog attack, an animal control unit and a sheriff's deputy responded to the home where the dog apparently lived. The dog was confiscated. A woman at that home, who was crying, declined to comment.  Neighbors saw the dog running loose in the neighborhood several times before, they said.

"That dog needs to be gone," Justine said.

http://miami.cbslocal.com/2015/03/28/fort-lauderdale-mother-son-in-hospital-after-dog-attack/

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-dog-bite-wounds-20150328-story.html