Friday, January 27, 2017

GLASGOW SCOTLAND - A 3-YEAR-OLD GIRL WAS HOLDING HER BIG SISTER'S HAND WHILE WALKING INTO A SHOP FOR SWEETS WHEN A BULLMASTIFF LUNGED FOR HER NECK BITING A GASH JUST 2 CENTIMETERS FROM HER JUGULAR VEIN

Kinzara Stirton, from Glasgow, needed several operations after she was attacked by the dog

A toddler was left needing plastic surgery after she had her throat ripped open by a  BULLMASTIFF
Kinzara Stirton, from Glasgow, was attacked by the dog as her mother dropped her off at the shops to buy sweets with her older sister, Kiera, 17.
Doctors said the three-year-old, who has been scarred for life, was 'lucky to be alive' after the dog bit a chunk of flesh out of her neck, missing her jugular vein by centimetres. 

Kinzara's mother Kristina Stirton, 40, said her daughter battled several infections in her neck and needed four operations in a bid to avoid lasting damage to her nerves.

The dog involved was destroyed but the owners were not prosecuted.  One year on Ms Stirton is sharing her story in a bid to raise awareness of dangerous dogs. 

Ms Stirton, a full time mother-of-four, said: 'I had dropped her off with her older sister when the Bullmastif launched an unprovoked attack on Kinzara.

'There was blood everywhere, Kinzara was just in shock and wasn't moving or saying anything. 

'When Keira came running to the car screaming I knew something terrible had happened. She just kept saying, "Kinzara has been bitten." 

'The bite marks were really deep and she needed dozens of stitches to stop the blood from pouring out.

'I had no idea if Kinzara was even going to survive the car journey, the amount of blood was like something out of a horror film. 
'The doctors explained she was just two centimetres from her jugular vein and she was extremely lucky to have survived.' 

She added: 'It made me feel sick that we came so close to losing Kinzara. Since the ordeal Kinzara has been scared of dogs and will latch onto me if we see one in the street.

'I just want the law to change so that any owners of dogs that attack are prosecuted regardless of whether there are witnesses.' 

Ms Stirton added: 'Kiera blamed herself for the accident and was holding her hand as the dog launched at her face.

'She was hysterical when it first happened and it took a long time to reassure her that it wasn't her fault.' 

Ms Stirton attempted to sue for compensation but has hit a brick wall.

She added: 'Kinzara's face is now dented on one side but we are so thankful she's alive and the attack wasn't any worse.
'Thanks to her sisters, Kiera, Kristine, six, and Aria, two, she has been able to move on with her life.

'I hope our story comes as a warning to the public and owners of dogs who have a dangerous temperament.' 



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