Wednesday, June 20, 2018

FLORENCE AL - MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE PIT BULL MAULING OF ROSE HOLT, 78: "THE ATTACK LASTED ON AND OFF FOR ABOUT 30 MINUTES... "THEY WOULD GET TIRED AND LAY DOWN UNDER HER PATIO AND WHEN SHE WOULD YELL FOR HELP THEY WOULD START BACK ATTACKING HER" ...HERO JAMES MEYER AND HIS WIFE DONNA DROVE BY AND FOUGHT THE DOGS TO SAVE HER!!!



A local woman is recovering from the attack of TWO PIT BULLDOGS, and the Florence Police Department has launched a “dangerous dog investigation” into the incident.


Officials with Eliza Coffee Memorial Hospital said Tuesday that Rose Holt was in fair condition as she recovers from the attack that occurred Friday afternoon in her backyard.
“She’s doing OK under the circumstances,” said her granddaughter, Mia Berryman. “She has bite marks all over her from head to toe.”
Berryman said the worst injury is to her grandmother’s ankle, where one of the dogs punctured her Achilles tendon.
Police detective Capt. Brad Holmes said the newly enacted “Emily’s Law" that went into effect June 1 provides a process to have a dog deemed “dangerous.”
He said the law stipulates animals will remain under the control of Animal Services until the case is heard in municipal court where a judge can confirm the animal is dangerous, or conclude the circumstances do not meet the law in terms of dangerous behavior.
Holmes said both animals have been confiscated. One is being held at the animal shelter. A bystander shot the other dog. It survived and is being held in Huntsville. He said both animals are current on their shots and vaccinations.
If the dogs are determined to be dangerous, the owners must either release the animals to Animal Services for them to be humanely euthanized, or file a request to take the animals back.
Holmes said if the owner fights to keep the animals and wins, the dogs must be spayed or neutered; microchipped; kept in a locked pen with four sides, a top and a concrete bottom, or fencing that extends at least 2 feet into the ground; pay an annual $100 dangerous-dog registration fee; and must secure a $100,000 surety bond that provides coverage for dog bites, injuries, or death caused by the dog.
Holmes said under the new law, criminal charges apply only after the dogs have been deemed dangerous, or if the investigation proves the owner had prior knowledge of the dangerous behavior, yet acted recklessly under the circumstances.
Berryman said her grandmother had walked into the backyard to water her flowers.
“She said she turned around, and the dogs were on her,” Berryman said. “She said they knocked her down and started biting her. At some point, she hit her head three to four times on the concrete.”
Berryman said according to her grandmother, THE ATTACK LASTED ON AND OFF FOR ABOUT 30 MINUTES.  SHE SAID THE ANIMALS WOULD ATTACK, GET TIRED, AND GO LAY DOWN UNDER HER PATIO TO CATCH THEIR BREATH.   SHE WOULD YELL FOR HELP, AND THEY WOULD START BACK ATTACKING HER.  
She said a passerby heard her grandmother.
“The man got bit trying to get them off and his wife called 911,” Berryman said.
Berryman said her main concern is that the dogs don’t return to the neighborhood.

1 comment:

Farmer Jane said...

"Holmes said if the owner fights to keep the animals and wins, the dogs must be spayed or neutered; microchipped; kept in a locked pen with four sides, a top and a concrete bottom, or fencing that extends at least 2 feet into the ground; pay an annual $100 dangerous-dog registration fee; and must secure a $100,000 surety bond that provides coverage for dog bites, injuries, or death caused by the dog."

My county has this law. However, after the dog was given a TRIAL!! and deemed "dangerous" the worthless, POS owner was allowed to get the dog back with no stipulations as long as the dog was moved out of the county. This was a single 40 pound female pit bull who attacked my herd of nine cows and a bull twice in the course of 10 days. The first time two of the cows were seriously injured, requiring vet care for torn ears and faces. The second time the dog actually took down and injured a full grown Watusi cow so badly that the vet couldn't save her. This dangerous dog was sent to a different county without so much as a microchip to identify it or a heads-up to the local AC. I can only hope that Emily's Law is allowed to function without such loop holes.